Cotton

Cotton is a soft fiber that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant (Gossypium spp.), a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and the Americas.

The fiber is most often spun into thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile, which is the most widely used natural-fiber cloth in clothing today.Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article “Cotton“, which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Healthy diet

A healthy diet contains a balance of food groups and all the nutrients necessary to promote good health.

Human nutrition is enormously complex and a healthy diet may vary widely according to an individual’s genetic makeup, environment, and health.

Healthy eating is the practice of making choices about what and/or how much one eats with the intention of improving or maintaining good health.

Typically, this means following recommendations for a healthy diet.

The concept of healthy eating is primarily a problem in rich countries where the lifestyle includes a modicum of outdoor physical activities, high but not always high-quality food consumption, and a trend towards industrially-produced foods instead of locally-sourced, locally-prepared meals.Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article “Healthy diet“, which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Diabetic diet

The diet frequently recommended for people who suffer from diabetes mellitus is one that is high in dietary fibre, especially soluble fibre, but low in fat (especially saturated fat) and sugar.

Patients may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index.

However, in cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycaemia.

For people with diabetes, healthy eating is not simply a matter of “what one eats”, but also when one eats.Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article “Diabetic diet“, which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.For more information, see the following related content on ScienceDaily:

Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is a modern nutritional model inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of some of the countries of the Mediterranean basin, particularly Southern Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, Turkey and Spain.

Common to the diets of these regions are a high consumption of fruit and vegetables, bread and other cereals, olive oil and fish; making them low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber.

A main factor in the appeal of the Mediterranean Diet is its rich, full flavored foods.

Margarine and other unhealthy hydrogenated oils are considered bland and lacking the flavor olive oil can impart to foods.

Red wine is also consumed regularly but in moderate quantities.Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article “Mediterranean diet“, which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk

A diet high in fiber and yogurt is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers published in JAMA Oncology.

The benefits of a diet high in fiber and yogurt have already been established for cardiovascular disease and gastrointestinal cancer. The new findings based on an analysis of data from studies involving 1.4 million adults in the United States, Europe and Asia suggest this diet may also protect against lung cancer.

Participants were divided into five groups, according to the amount of fiber and yogurt they consumed. Those with the highest yogurt and fiber consumption had a 33% reduced lung cancer risk as compared to the group who did not consume yogurt and consumed the least amount of fiber.

“Our study provides strong evidence supporting the U.S. 2015-2020 Dietary Guideline recommending a high fiber and yogurt diet,” said senior author Xiao-Ou Shu, MD, PhD, MPH, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research, associate director for Global Health and co-leader of the Cancer Epidemiology Research Program at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.

“This inverse association was robust, consistently seen across current, past and never smokers, as well as men, women and individuals with different backgrounds,” she added.

Shu said the health benefits may be rooted in their prebiotic (nondigestible food that promotes growth of beneficial microorganisms in the intestines) and probiotic properties. The properties may independently or synergistically modulate gut microbiota in a beneficial way.

The study’s lead authors are Jae Jeong Yang, PhD, a visiting research fellow from the Seoul National University, South Korea, and Danxia Yu, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt